Wines | Wine Racks

By: Wine Racks  11-11-2011
Keywords: Vineyards, Sauvignon Blanc, fine dining

Archive for 'Wines'

August 4th, 2009 by , under , , , , , , .

Nitida Hand Made Wines

Nitida Hand Made Wines

Our most recent recruits RJ and Getha have both demonstrated true Nitida tenacity in their first year with us. RJ has just returned from a harvest at Chateau Angelus, a Premier Grand Cru Clesse in ST Emilion, France. It sounds like a life-altering experience “everybody lives for wine” and “the food is just fantastic”. On the red wine side, this area specialises (like Durbanville) in Merlot led Bordeaux blends to produce elegant fruit driven styles with only a touch of cabernet. Adding to this “intravenous” learning curve, he had to cope with the consequences of recurring downpours during his first harvest. Despite a hard year, he finds himself head-over-heels in love with Durbanville and with working on a small farm where he can be involved in every aspect of the vineyard and cellar.

Getha has had just as hectic an initiation, running our farm events including a monthly “farmer’s market”, a once-off African cultural circus show, our spring sauvignon blanc festival and hosting a number of duathlons and cycling races. She has fended off the “harvest grumbles”, braved our sopping wet and treacherous dirt roads all winter and even managed to remain fairly relaxed as she sneezed her way through the high pollen counts of spring. After all of this she still declares herself to be happy.

Jacus and Elrina’s children are growing up so quickly. Their Christmas present last year is crawling at high speed and showing keen intent to walk and talk. Liebe is very excited about starting at big school on the farm next year.

Henriette paid a short visit to Southern Africa to see her family and arrange her wedding.

The Vellers have had an “interesting” year and have considered writing “Durbanville does Dallas” if the right publisher appears. Our children have all worked really hard and reaped the rewards they deserve, they are all healthy and remind us daily how lucky we are. If we ever forget this, a beautiful sunset with a glass of Nitida sauvignon blanc in hand is not to be sneezed at.

www.woodenwineracks.co.za

August 4th, 2009 by , under , , , , , , .

Durbanville Wine Valley Association

Durbanville Wine Valley Association

Nestled in the Tygerberg Hills, a mere 20 minutes drive from Cape Town, lies the Durbanville Wine Valley. With its hectares of flourishing vineyards, award winning wines and hospitable atmosphere, this wine route is fast becoming the Cape’s destination of choice. The Durbanville Wine Valley consists of nine wineries, each offering the finest in wines, and complemented with some of the best fine dining restaurants and intimate country kitchens in the region.

We are united in our passion to reflect the Durbanville terroir in all our wines. The result is a magnificent range of intense, fruit-driven yet elegant wines, as different from each other as the slopes that create them and the individual personalities who craft them.

www.woodenwineracks.co.za

August 4th, 2009 by , under , , , , , , , .

Swartland Wine Route Western Cape

Swartland Wine Route Western Cape

Close enough to get to, yet far enough to get away….Escape the hustle and bustle of city life and discover one of the wine gems of the country – the Swartland Santam Wine Route.  Located within an hour’s drive from Cape Town, visitors will be enchanted by the warm hospitality, award-winning wines and great cuisine.

The route was established in 1986 and stretches from Paardeberg in the south to the Berg River in the north and encompasses the beautiful Riebeek Valley and the towns of Malmesbury, Piketberg and Porterville.   The Swartland Santam Wine Route is an ideal day trip destination from Cape Town, while tourists heading towards the West Coast, Northern Cape or Namibia along the N7 will also find a detour along the Swartland Wine Route a delightful journey of discovery.

With its rolling hills and sweeping vistas of wheat fields and vineyards, the vastness of the Swartland provides visitors with the opportunity to relax and absorb the essence of this region.
In the Swartland, visitors are welcomed as family and are guaranteed to leave with a story to pass along.

Each producer offers guests a uniquely different experience due to the geographical diversity of the area.  The route currently has a total of 20 members, including co-operatives, private cellars, garagistes and wine merchants.  Explore the winemaking history of the region at some of the historic estates or enjoy exquisite wine experiences at modern tasting rooms. Smaller wineries present intimate wine tastings in rustic cellars, while family concerns dating back generations will welcome visitors with the customary Swartland hospitality.

The Swartland not only offers sublime wines, but also plenty of exciting outdoor activities, value for money accommodation options and exemplary cuisine at a diverse selection of restaurants in the region.  Olive production forms an important part of agricultural activities in the region and many wineries offer a variety of olive products for sale.

www.woodenwineracks.co.za

July 28th, 2009 by , under , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , .

South African Wine

South African Wines

In keeping with the spirit of renewal in the South African wine industry, in recent years over 40% of the vineyards have been replanted as the industry has realigned its product to compete globally, moving from volume production to noble cultivars and quality wines. South African vineyards have been dominated by white grape varieties but the trend now is towards a more market-driven balance between white and red.

Noble varieties which have been cultivated increasingly in the past few years include Sauvignon Blanc and Chardonnay, which produce top-class white wines, and Cabernet Sauvignon, Shiraz and Pinot Noir. A significant proportion of our red wine vineyards are currently very young – 52% are under 10 years old.

Some of our oldest grape varieties (also called cultivars) date back to ancient times and were developed from wild vines. The original wild vine belongs to the genus Vitis and it is generally accepted that it was cultivated for the first time in Asia Minor, south of the Caspian and Black seas. All the wine grape varieties cultivated in South Africa, which were originally imported from Europe, belong to the species Vitis vinifera. Unfortunately the roots of European vines are susceptible to an insect disease called phylloxera and, in order to avoid it, they are often grafted onto American rootstock which is largely resistant to the insect.

A vine yields its first crop after three years and is fully productive after five. On average, the South African vineyard is replaced after 25 years but this depends on factors such as the area in which it is situated and how heavily it has yielded. Generally, its lifespan may be anything between 15 and 30 years although vines as old as 100 years still in production can be found.

The vine is a remarkable plant which lends itself to selection, propagation and grafting factors which make possible a continuous improvement in both plant and quality. Although most of the vine varieties cultivated here today were originally imported, up to now six local crossings have been released. The best known of these is a red variety, Pinotage, a hybrid of Pinot Noir and Hermitage (Cinsaut), which is cultivated locally on a fairly large scale.

The Worcester Region has the most vineyard plantings (19% of all vines), followed by Paarl and Stellenbosch (17%), Robertson (14%), Malmesbury (12 %), Olifants River (9%), Orange River (9%) and Little Karoo (3%).

The Worcester Region also produces the most wine (24%), followed by Olifants River (17%), Robertson (14%), Paarl and Orange River (12%), Stellenbosch and Malmesbury (9%), and Little Karoo (3%).

www.woodenwineracks.co.za

July 28th, 2009 by , under , , , , , , , , , , , , , , .

Wine Country

Wine Country

What is the most popular grape cultivar produced on earth? Where is it from? Where does the South African wine industry feature on the worldwide wine map? Is Pinotage such a groundbreaking wine?

All these questions and more, answered right here.

In South Africa, our largest production most famous wine grape cultivars are Chenin Blanc, Cabernet Sauvignon and Colombar. A much larger portion of the South African terroir is conducive to the growing of these grapes.

But, I believe this has created an enormous mis-perception of wine producers and top grape cultivars globally among the general wine loving people in SA.

You see, many of you would be profoundly surprised to learn that the top wine grape cultivar in the world is Airén, a white wine grape grown predominantly in Spain.

It amounts to roughly 30% of all wine grapes grown in Spain and spans a massive 756 000 hectares. [The Airén vine has an unusually low vine density (around 1500 vines per hectare), and so its vineyards cover more area than any other grape variety in the world.]

This should explain its ability to outrank a popular cultivar such as Cabernet Sauvignon, second largest grape cultivar in the world spanning 701 000 hectares across predominantly France, Chile and the USA.

How does South African wine grape production size compare with the world? Let’s see. Our top cultivar, Chenin Blanc, spans across 19 100 hectares across mainly Worcester, Malmesbury and Paarl. In 20th position on the world wine grape cultivar list, Cataratto Bianco Comune spans across 107 200 hectares. [Quality over quantity, right?]

While South Africa’s industry is very small, ranking in at only 16th with about 1.5% of global plantings it is our production and quality that sees us at 7th position, accounting for 3% of the world’s wine.

What are the white vs. red wine grapes by area ratio? In the top 20 wine grape cultivars in the world by area, 9 of the wine grapes are white wine grapes, while 11 are red wine grapes. In the top 10, 4 are white wine grapes and 6 are red wine grapes.

Another thing I think that would have the general public confused is the perception that Pinotage is our main export to the international market. Yes, we were the first to introduce Pinotage to the world, but in terms of production, Pinotage, a cross between Pinot Noir and Cinsaut (grown under the name of Hermitage in South Africa) ranks a mere 8th on the top 20 cultivars in South Africa with Cinsaut individually ranking at 10th and Pinot Noir a mere 18th spanning only 577 hectares.

www.woodenwineracks.co.za

July 28th, 2009 by , under , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , .

Wines of South Africa

Wines of South Africa

All the cultivars used in South Africa belong to the Vitis vinifera species which was originally imported from Europe. Although most of the cultivars cultivated locally today were originally imported, various unique South African cultivars created by crossing varietals have been released. The best known is the red variety Pinotage, which is a cross between Pinot Noir and Cinsaut. Also attracting attention is the white variety Nouvelle, a crossing of Semillon and Crouchen Blanc (better known as Cape Riesling).

Approximately 75 cultivars have been approved for the production of Wines of Origin. Each cultivar has specific characteristics regarding its adaptability to the soil and climate, and the suitability of its fruit for the production of a wine with a specific style or of a specific quality. There is thus a close relationship between the cultivar, origin and the wine itself.

The use of the name of a grape cultivar on a label is authorised in terms of the Wine of Origin Scheme and only the cultivar names attached may be used. The name of a grape cultivar may be used if 75% (85% from 1 January 2006) of the content of the wine originates from that cultivar. It is prescribed that, if a wine is to be exported to the European Union, 85% of its content has to be from that specific cultivar.

www.woodenwineracks.co.za

July 28th, 2009 by , under , , , , , , , , .

Vineyard Varieties

Vineyard Varieties


In keeping with the spirit of renewal in the South African wine industry, in recent years over 40% of the vineyards have been replanted as the industry has realigned its product to compete globally, moving from volume production to noble cultivars and quality wines. South African vineyards have been dominated by white grape varieties but the trend now is towards a more market-driven balance between white and red.

Some of our oldest grape varieties (also called cultivars) date back to ancient times and were developed from wild vines. The original wild vine belongs to the genus Vitis and it is generally accepted that it was cultivated for the first time in Asia Minor, south of the Caspian and Black seas.

All the wine grape varieties cultivated in South Africa, which were originally imported from Europe, belong to the species Vitis vinifera. Unfortunately the roots of European vines are susceptible to an insect disease called phylloxera and, in order to avoid it, they are often grafted onto American rootstock which is largely resistant to the insect.

A vine yields its first crop after three years and is fully productive after five. On average, the South African vineyard is replaced after 25 years but this depends on factors such as the area in which it is situated and how heavily it has yielded. Generally, its lifespan may be anything between 15 and 30 years although vines as old as 100 years still in production can be found.
South African wine

The vine is a remarkable plant which lends itself to selection, propagation and grafting factors which make possible a continuous improvement in both plant and quality. Although most of the vine varieties cultivated here today were originally imported, up to now six local crossings have been released. The best known of these is a red variety, Pinotage, a hybrid of Pinot Noir and Hermitage (Cinsaut), which is cultivated locally on a fairly large scale.
Grape Varieties

Noble varieties which have been cultivated increasingly in the past few years include Sauvignon Blanc and Chardonnay, which produce top-class white wines, and Cabernet Sauvignon, Shiraz and Pinot Noir. A significant proportion of our red wine vineyards are currently very young – 52% are under 10 years old.

The Worcester Region has the most vineyard plantings (19% of all vines), followed by Paarl and Stellenbosch (17%), Robertson (14%), Malmesbury (12 %), Olifants River (9%), Orange River (9%) and Little Karoo (3%).

The Worcester Region also produces the most wine (26%), followed byOlifants River (16%), Robertson (15%), Paarl (13 %), Stellenbosch (10%), Orange River (9%), Malmesbury (8%) and Little Karoo (3,9 %).

www.woodenwineracks.co.za

July 22nd, 2009 by , under , , , , .

Wine By Me

Wine By Me

Wine racks are essential to your wine collection. Without wine racks where would you store your wine? You could just pack various refrigerators down with wine but then how would you find it? In this article I am going to help you figure out your options. Should you use a wine cellar or simply use wine racks?

Figuring out which you need can be done in a few easy steps. First how many bottles of wine are you going to store? Then how quickly do you drink wine you are storing? Lets start with these two questions to begin with. Decide how many bottles you will be collecting and plan for the future.

If you currently have 25 bottles of wine in your small collection but hope to add 10-20 bottles of wine a month don’t go small. Always plan out what you’ll need and go larger. Nothing is more troubling for me than having wine strewn about the floor while I decide my next move while tripping over wine trying to install the new wine racks when I should have had them to begin with. So if you need a 100 bottle rack go for the 175 bottle rack. Buy new racks well before you fill the old ones up. Figure in how quickly you drink the wine. If you drink it fast then large scale racks might not be the way to go. If you drink it slowly larger sturdier racks may be for you. Other options to consider for your wine collection include a wine room. If you have a wine room then the solution is simple; add your wine racks to your wine room. Although make sure the wine room has a proper cooling system and is out of the sun light; cool wine lasts longer. If you don’t have a wine room but want to store wine for a prolonged period I suggest a wine cellar.

Wine cellars are really not that expensive for what they provide you with. They not only provide racks already installed but they also provide cooling and prolonged storage capability. The cooling unit inside of a wine cellar keeps wine stored at the best possible setting for as many years as you need. You control your wines settings and temperature.

All said and done you decide what is best for your and your collection. If you only collect a few bottles and only keep them for a couple of years before consumption then a plain or decorative 30 bottle rack will do what you need. Also small amounts like that will not require cooling as long as your plan is to store them for short amounts of time at room temperature and away from the sun.

www.woodenwineracks.co.za

Keywords: Award Winning Wines, Christmas Present, fine dining, Hand Made Wines, Red Wine, Sauvignon Blanc, Vineyards

Other products and services from Wine Racks

11-11-2011

Modern Wine Racks | Wine Racks

Throughout the year, WineRacks.com continues to support the Fest’s designated charity, the Food Bank of the Hudson Valley, a division of the Regional Food Bank of Northeastern NY and a member of America’s Second Harvest, a national food bank network. Smaller wineries present intimate wine tastings in rustic cellars, while family concerns dating back generations will welcome visitors with the customary Swartland hospitality.


11-11-2011

Unique Wine Racks | Wine Racks

Throughout the year, WineRacks.com continues to support the Fest’s designated charity, the Food Bank of the Hudson Valley, a division of the Regional Food Bank of Northeastern NY and a member of America’s Second Harvest, a national food bank network. The Durbanville Wine Valley consists of nine wineries, each offering the finest in wines, and complemented with some of the best fine dining restaurants and intimate country kitchens in the region.


11-11-2011

Wooden Wine Stands | Wine Racks

Getha has had just as hectic an initiation, running our farm events including a monthly “farmer’s market”, a once-off African cultural circus show, our spring sauvignon blanc festival and hosting a number of duathlons and cycling races. He finds himself head-over-heels in love with Durbanville and with working on a small farm where he can be involved in every aspect of the vineyard and cellar.


11-11-2011

Wine Racks | Wine Racks

The mystique of the four leaf clover continues today, since finding a real four leaf clover is still a rare occurrence and omen of good luck.The Marais family, seventh generation descendants of the French Huguenots who arrived in South Africa in the late 1600’s has farmed in the Robertson Valley for more than a hundred years.